The case study for the barycenter drivers of the solar cycle

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Paradigmer
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The case study for the barycenter drivers of the solar cycle

Post #1by Paradigmer » 26.02.2018, 12:47

Would like to share a case study research for the barycenter drivers of the solar cycle, which was evaluated with the Clestia Planetarium.

In case the above link does not work with old Arcobat reader, you can open this link with another browser:
http://www.uvs-model.com/The case study for the b ... drivers of the solar cycle.pdf

Or access it from my website in a topic on "The solar cycle", then scroll down a bit and look for the link that was labelled as "The case study for the barycenter drivers of the solar cycle".

This is still a work in progress.

The plotting of barycenters of gas giants and drawing their alignments with the Sun and SSB for the major peaks and troughs of solar cycles were manually done, so it was very limiting and not productive. Nonetheless, as it was, its finding is already very assertive.

We hope to get advise from the community here on how to develop the add-ons to get this done systematically in the Celestia Planetarium like how we had done it manually. This would enable us to effective and easily evaluate the barycenter driver for every dip and spike of sunspot number in any solar cycle. :help:

Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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Paradigmer
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Post #2by Paradigmer » 27.02.2018, 14:12

There could be another incentive to track the barycenters of the gas giants by tracking their Lagrangian points as well. This add-on with some interesting cometary trajectories also added, comet hunters could find Celestia an indispensable tool for predicting cometary outburst events.

A series of empirically observed Comet 29P outbursts from January 2008 to April 2010

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Paradigmer
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Post #3by Paradigmer » 28.02.2018, 10:59

Paradoxically, it is unthinkable to visualize the non existing objects in the Solar System that could not be visually observed.

Nonetheless, there are 19 cases (2 Min, 10 Min, 10 Max, 11 Min, 11 Max, 12 Max, 13 Min, 13 Max, 14 Min, 14 Max, 16 Max, 17 Min, 17 Max, 18 Min, 18 Max, 19 Min, 20 Max, 21 Max, and 23 Max) on the ISN proposed solar minima or maxima that were apparently driven by the alignments of Sun-SSB and the effective planetary barycenters, and they were not caused by any direct alignment of any two gas giants that aligns with the Sun. These peaks and troughs of the sunspots apparently were subliminally driven by the nonmaterial objects that have physical effects on the Sun.

Try to find any alignment of gas giants in this cases, would see nothing was driving the peaks and troughs of these solar cycles at all.

A planetarium with the add-on in one chart to dynamically show how the planetary barycenters oscillate to align with the alignment of Sun-SSB, could be very visually revealing.

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GrantWilson
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Post #4by GrantWilson » 16.01.2019, 09:39

Would like to share a case study research for the barycenter drivers of the solar cycle, which was evaluated with the Clestia Planetarium.

In case the above link does not work with old Arcobat reader, you can open this link with another browser:

http://www.uvs-model.com/The case study by_essay writer_for the b ... drivers of the solar cycle.pdf

Or access it from my website in a topic on "The solar cycle", then scroll down a bit and look for the link that was labelled as "The case study for the barycenter drivers of the solar cycle".

This is still a work in progress.

The plotting of barycenters of gas giants and drawing their alignments with the Sun and SSB for the major peaks and troughs of solar cycles were manually done, so it was very limiting and not productive. Nonetheless, as it was, its finding is already very assertive.

We hope to get advise from the community here on how to develop the add-ons to get this done systematically in the Celestia Planetarium like how we had done it manually. This would enable us to effective and easily evaluate the barycenter driver for every dip and spike of sunspot number in any solar cycle. :help:

Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Hi Paradigmer,

Are you planning to work on the non-material objects effects too? I've been thinking to use Celestia Planetarium for my project (mostly for the textures), but unfortunately, the link to Hutchison's work on Saturn's rings is not working (taken from github).

Grant

Janus
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Post #5by Janus » 17.01.2019, 05:08

Hi, looked through the paper, had some trouble because I have trouble reading high level math.
Since I am self taught from a very young age, the way I see things is different.
I hated school, they conflated data regurgitation with knowledge.
Memorizing is okay for a few weeks, but by understanding it, learning is for a lifetime.

Anyway, looking through it, I found what is to me a parallel.
It looks to me like you are saying that the barycenter offsets of the planets causes a gravitic eddy effect in the solar plasma.
With gravitic forces alternately offsetting, adding, subtracting from the purely magnetic(ionic?) flow of the plasma?
The combination of these offsets forming eddies that furl and unfurl, sometimes unwinding all the way past the surface of the sun?
Kind of a sub roche interaction akin to ferrofluids reacting to magnets?

I am asking because it reminds me of the interaction between the moon and earth.
Driving the tides mainly, but also providing impetus and flexure for continental drift.
Could/Would that make volcanoes the equivalent type of byproduct as solar flares?

On another note.
For plotting purposes of the barycenters as offsets.
I suggest you start with something like this.

https://gist.github.com/alex-quiterio/5659190

Which is a javascript driven spirograph.
Nominally it only contains two spirals, however, more can be added.
This would permit you plot the end shape of N cycles, adjusting phases as you go.
Then rotate the barycenter orbit, or do a tear off to compare it to sun spot activity.
Beware though, the barycenter will move in and out of the solar body, so be sure your library takes that into account.
You could either plot it as an offset against true solar center as a gross comparison.
Or compare rotation phases of known phenomenon to look for offsets.

For anyone wanting a quick reference of barycenter offsets.

http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/centermass.htm

Which can then be looked at while remembering the sun takes 24.47 days to rotate on its own axis.

Sorry to ramble, but I hope I managed to actually ask my question somewhere in there.
I hope the spirograph thing for shapes will help you.


Janus.


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