Catalogue of star ages

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Cormoran
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Catalogue of star ages

Post #1by Cormoran » 17.05.2006, 17:34

Hello all,

I was wondering if anyone is aware of a catalogue of stellar ages (I would assume estimated from metallicity)?

All part of my continuing obsession with mapping the heavens in 3D :)

Thanks,

Cormie
'...Gold planets, Platinum Planets, Soft rubber planets with lots of earthquakes....' The HitchHikers Guide to the Galaxy, Page 634784, Section 5a. Entry: Magrathea

ajtribick
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Post #2by ajtribick » 17.05.2006, 19:05

This isn't entirely what you want, but it's a fairly extensive list of age estimates for stars known to have extrasolar planets.

On the Ages of Exoplanet Host Stars

Malenfant
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Post #3by Malenfant » 18.05.2006, 05:54

If you wade through the list at http://www.solstation.com/stars.htm you can find age estimates for some of the stars described there...

Beyond that there's not all that much out there unless you're looking for ages of globular clusters, it's not easy to figure out the ages of stars it seems...
My Celestia page: Spica system, planetary magnitudes script, updated demo.cel, Quad system

Dollan
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Post #4by Dollan » 18.05.2006, 06:32

Here's a page that focuses on some older stars: http://ancientsuns.com/planets/humanity ... trich.html

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Ynjevi
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Post #5by Ynjevi » 18.05.2006, 17:29

You might like to check the The Geneva-Copenhagen survey of the Solar neighbourhood catalog, which contains lots of data (including ages) on Sunlike stars in the solar neighborhood.

Magua
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Post #6by Magua » 18.05.2006, 21:48

Hello, this is very interesting theme. Does somebody know, is there any calculations of star diameters and luminosity in their geological pasts, espescially for our Sun? I have read that Sun's diameter decreases about 1.5m per hour (but it was untrusted source).

Sorry, I don't speak english good :oops:

Topic author
Cormoran
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Post #7by Cormoran » 19.05.2006, 17:48

Gentlemen,

Thank you for your assistance. I will examine these sources over the weekend.

In my current activities, I am discovering quite how much we DON'T know about stars (and the good reasons behind that lack of knowledge). Also, I am finding how approximate some of the mathematical approximations of stellar behaviour are. Try working out the radius of Deneb using its temperature and luminosity. The formulae I have found to translate Absolute magnitude to luminosity as the first part of the above process seem to result in figures that send the results of the next step or two into impossibility....

Those are questions for other days, I think. I had enough trouble loading Tycho-3 into my catalogue database, and then discovering the parallaxes to be almost useless? Not fun :lol:

See ya later, folks

Cormie
'...Gold planets, Platinum Planets, Soft rubber planets with lots of earthquakes....' The HitchHikers Guide to the Galaxy, Page 634784, Section 5a. Entry: Magrathea

Topic author
Cormoran
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With us: 17 years 1 month
Location: Slartibartfast's Shed, London

Post #8by Cormoran » 21.05.2006, 14:34

Gentlemen, and in particular Ynjevi,

I have now examined the Geneva-Copenhagen data, and found it to be just what I was looking for, so many thanks indeed.

I'll be taking that data and cross-referencing it with the other sources cited for comparison and completeness.

Thank you again,

Cormie
'...Gold planets, Platinum Planets, Soft rubber planets with lots of earthquakes....' The HitchHikers Guide to the Galaxy, Page 634784, Section 5a. Entry: Magrathea


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