Epistellar Planets

General physics and astronomy discussions not directly related to Celestia
Topic author
ajtribick
Posts: 1784
Joined: 11.08.2003
With us: 16 years 5 months
Location: Switzerland

Epistellar Planets

Post #1by ajtribick » 26.08.2003, 20:18

There seem to be an awful lot of epistellar gas giant planets out there. As far as I have been able to find out, the best theory for their formation is that they migrated inwards from the outer regions of the planet-forming disk.

My question is, would it be possible to get an epistellar planet with the mass of Earth or Mars in this way, or would there not be enough drag on the planet to cause it to move inwards like this?

Evil Dr Ganymede
Posts: 1386
Joined: 06.06.2003
With us: 16 years 7 months

Post #2by Evil Dr Ganymede » 27.08.2003, 01:43

I thought 'epistellar' meant 'almost a star' - i.e. supermassive jovian worlds/brown dwarfs. But it seems you think it means 'star-hugging' - ie anything really close to the star.

Am I wrong?

Topic author
ajtribick
Posts: 1784
Joined: 11.08.2003
With us: 16 years 5 months
Location: Switzerland

Post #3by ajtribick » 27.08.2003, 08:53

The term is used at Extrasolar Visions to mean planets really close to their star. Also, if I remember my Greek lessons correctly, epi means "on", hence "on the star"... a planet which is almost on the star.

Evil Dr Ganymede
Posts: 1386
Joined: 06.06.2003
With us: 16 years 7 months

Post #4by Evil Dr Ganymede » 27.08.2003, 10:38

chaos syndrome wrote:The term is used at Extrasolar Visions to mean planets really close to their star. Also, if I remember my Greek lessons correctly, epi means "on", hence "on the star"... a planet which is almost on the star.


Fair enough - I stand corrected! :oops:
*Evil Dr G adds new word to vocabulary* :D

Thinking about it, I guess the brown dwarfs must be referred to as 'substellar objects', right? D'oh.

granthutchison
Developer
Posts: 1863
Joined: 21.11.2002
With us: 17 years 2 months

Post #5by granthutchison » 27.08.2003, 17:33

Evil Dr Ganymede wrote:*Evil Dr G adds new word to vocabulary*
But what a horrible word. :cry:

[pedantry]
It's a bastard mixture of Greek and Latin, for starters, but epi- also has no useful contrasting prefix apart from endo-, inside, which is obviously inappropriate here.
Better would have been peristellar, to be contrasted with apostellar for Jovians that remain in their region of formation. Or, if it was felt peristellar already had a useful, but more general, meaning assigned to it (as in "peristellar disc"), we could have had adstellar, with the potential for a contrasting abstellar.
Sigh. Words are too important to let scientists go around making them up on the spur of the moment ...
[/pedantry]

Grant


Return to “Physics and Astronomy”

Who is online