Pictures from Celestia

General discussion about Celestia that doesn't fit into other forums.
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trappistplanets
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Post #681by trappistplanets » 19.06.2021, 14:09

Eric Nelson wrote:Antares A (in the Antares binary star system) with its big white eyes staring at you.
looks like you used my antares artistic impression texture, make sure you edit the message and credit me if that is my texture please

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Post #682by Eric Nelson » 19.06.2021, 15:04

trappistplanets wrote:looks like you used my antares artistic impression texture, make sure you edit the message and credit me if that is my texture please
Just edited the message.
The concept was originally from NASA (based on the detail captured) but was modified (by you) to be mapped onto a sphere or supergiant mesh.
I gave NASA credit as well.

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Post #683by Eric Nelson » 20.06.2021, 06:18

MY Camelopardalis, a contact binary 4 kpc from Sol, consisting of 2 O6V((f)) stars of nearly identical radii.
7.06 Rsol for A and 7.01 Rsol for B (though elongated to exceed 9 and 9.5 Rsol by tidal bulges).
Each star takes 28.2108336 Earth years to orbit their barycenter.

From nussun's My_Cam addon, modified to work with Art Blos' Celestia Origin: https://celestia.space/forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=21114

Added after 33 minutes:
CW Leonis (CW Leo) and La Superba, carbon red giants.
I had to modify La Superba for a more proper radius (yet added the name La Superba) and make an addon for CW Leo since Celestia doesn't include CW Leo by default and I haven't seen anyone else make an addon with CW Leo with all the parameters.
The meshes and textures (by nussun) https://celestia.space/forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=20364 can be added to the files if you're using them.

Added after 4 hours 20 minutes:
Alpha Orionis.
Also known as Betelgeuse.

The largest star in the constellation Orion.

An M1Ia-M2Ia-Iab red supergiant.

764 + 116 - 62 x Sol's radius.
168.1 + 27.5 - 14.9 pc from Sol.

Anywhere from 90000 to 150000 x Sol's luminosity (putting the average at 126000 + 83000 - 50000).

Its dimming periods have gotten astronomers excited about its potential supernova days coming very soon.
Though it's been known pulsations and dust clouds were responsible for dimming (in which pulsations are related to the time of its life).
It's fusing helium at its core right now (even a 547.96 year difference based on its distance is negligible in an astronomical timeframe) and is expected to go supernova within 100000 Earth years.

Once it dies, its supernova glow's expected to outshine most Moon phases as seen from Earth, be visible even during daylight and last between 2 and 3 months before dimming into oblivion.
Unlike any event we've ever witnessed since ancient times.

Despite its mass of at least 16.5 x Sol's, its core's not massive enough to form a black hole and is expected to become a neutron star with 1.5 x Sol's mass.
Attachments
betelgeuse.png
Betelgeuse, 547.96 ly from Sol, 16.5 x Sol's mass, 764 x Sol's radius (rounded to 760 Rsol on Celestia's rendered graph), 126000 x Sol's average luminosity.
r_dor.zip
R Doradus.
(311 Bytes) Downloaded 40 times
carbon _C_type_red_giants.zip
Carbon red giant stars such as CW Leonis and La Superba.
(465 Bytes) Downloaded 44 times
cw leo.png
CW Leonis, a bright red C9,5e giant 90 pc and measuring 560 x Sol's radius. It's definitely near the end of its life.
la superba.png
La Superba, a C7Ib red giant 230 pc from Sol and peaking at 352 x Sol's radius (rounded to 350 Rsol on the rendered Celestia graph).
r dor.png
R Doradus, an M8III:e bright red giant 55 pc and 298 x Sol's radius - rounded to 300 Rsol on the rendered Celestia graph).
my cam.png
MY Camelopardalis, a contact binary 4 kpc from Sol, consisting of 2 O6V((f)) stars of nearly identical radii.
my cam1.png
MY Camelopardalis, a contact binary 4 kpc from Sol, consisting of 2 O6V((f)) stars of nearly identical radii.
Last edited by Eric Nelson on 21.06.2021, 12:10, edited 3 times in total.

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Post #684by Eric Nelson » 20.06.2021, 13:04

Added after 24 minutes 51 seconds:
Red Supergiant Cluster 1 Stars
The stars of the 1st compact cluster of red supergiants.
Red Supergiant Cluster 1 (RSGC1).
All stars in this cluster are 6.6 kpc from Sol.

Added after 24 minutes 28 seconds:
VV Cephei
VV Cephei.

An eclipsing binary star system.
Located 1.5 kpc from Sol.

The main star VV Cep A is an M2Iab red supergiant with an estimated radius (using photometric methods) calculated at 0.00638 arcseconds to equal 1050 x that of Sol based on eclipse timings.

VV Cep B is a B1V blue subgiant measured to peak at 25 x Sol's radius.

Both stars take 20.3440348 Earth years to orbit each other, resulting in tidal locking despite semi major axes between 12.3 and 12.5 AU (astronomical units) and eccentricities of 0.25 in their orbits.
Yet they're tidally bulged by their tidal forces making their maximum radii nearly 1% greater than their minimum radii.

Added after 6 minutes 59 seconds:
Mu Cephei
MU Cephei, an M2Ia red supergiant located 940 + 140 - 40 pc, 19.2 +/- 0.1 x Sol's mass, 972 +/- 228 x Sol's radius and 135000 to 340000 x Sol's luminosity (averaging at 269000 x Sol's).

Added after 24 minutes 57 seconds:
Yellow Hypergiants
The yellow hypergiants.

Rho Cassiopeiae is a semiregular variable star located 1050 +/- 210 pc from Sol and at times its a G2Iae (yellow hypergiant) star while at other times its an F8pIa (white hypergiant) star and K0pIa-0 (orange hypergiant) star.
Its mass is usually around 40 x Sol's though its radius is affected by the variations though is usually around 450 x Sol's.
Its luminosity compared to Sol's is 129000-302000-530000 x upon variability.

V382 Carinae is a G2Ia (yellow hypergiant) star located 1.9 kpc from Sol with a mass around 20 x Sol's, a radius 485 x Sol's and a luminosity 212000 +/- 12300 x Sol's.

V509 Cassiopeiae is a G0Ia0 (yellow hypergiant) star located 4810 +/- 430 pc from Sol.
It's absolute magnitude is usually -8.6 at that distance but varies.
Its mass is 11 x Sol's, its radius peaks at 910 x Sol's and its luminosity is 180000 to 40000 x Sol's (with the average luminosity at 269000 x Sol's).

I made a file for those stars and some were modified to fit the proper radii and parameters.
The texture was made by nussun from this section: https://celestia.space/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=20398&p=150437&hilit=yellow+hypergiant#p150437

Added after 8 minutes 56 seconds:
KY Cygni
KY Cygni, an M3Ia red supergiant located 1500 +/- 100 pc from Sol.
Its mass is unknown, but its radius is currently estimated at 1033 x Sol's and its luminosity's estimated anywhere between 138000 and 270000 x Sol's in variability.
It's also a cool red hypergiant.
Attachments
KY cyg.png
KY Cygni, an M3Ia red supergiant and hypergiant 1.5 kpc from Sol with a radius 1033 x Sol's and variable luminosity from 138000 to 270000 x Sol's.
cassiopeiae.png
The yellow hypergiants of Cassopeia, including Rho and V509 Cassiopeiae. Notice the dramatic differences in radii and they still fall into that category. Though Rho especially is a big deal of a variable star.
v382 car.png
V382 Carinae, a G21a yellow hypergiant 1.9 kpc from Sol, 20 x Sol's mass, 485 x Sol's radius and 212000 x Sol's luminosity.
Yellow_Hypergiants.zip
The famous yellow hypergiants.
(433 Bytes) Downloaded 45 times
MU cep.png
MU Cephei, an M2Ia red supergiant 940 pc, 19.2 x Sol's mass, 972 x Sol's radius (rounded to 970 Rsun on Celestia's rendered graph) and 269000 x Sol's luminosity.
vv cep.png
The VV Cephei binary star system.
RSGC1-F01.png
RSGC1-F01 [FMR2006] 01 - an M5I red supergiant estimated at 1726 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1700 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F02.png
RSGC1-F02 [FMR2006] 02 - an M2I red supergiant estimated at 1499 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1500 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F03.png
RSGC1-F03 [FMR2006] 03 - an M5I red supergiant estimated at 1294 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1300 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F04.png
RSGC1-F04 [FMR2006] 04 - an M1I red supergiant estimated at 914 x Sol's radius (rounded to 910 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F05.png
RSGC1-F05 [FMR2006] 05 - an M4I red supergiant estimated at 1047 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1000 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F06.png
RSGC1-F06 [FMR2006] 06 - an M5I red supergiant estimated at 1280 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1300 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F07.png
RSGC1-F07 [FMR2006] 07 - an M3I red supergiant estimated at 1162 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1200 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F08.png
RSGC1-F08 [FMR2006] 08 - an M3I red supergiant estimated at 1088 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1100 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F09.png
RSGC1-F09 [FMR2006] 09 - an M6I red supergiant estimated at 1288 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1300 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F10.png
RSGC1-F10 [FMR2006] 10 - an M3I red supergiant estimated at 1119 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1100 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F11.png
RSGC1-F11 [FMR2006] 11 - an M5I red supergiant estimated at 955 x Sol's radius (rounded to 960 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F12.png
RSGC1-F12 [FMR2006] 12 - an M0I red supergiant estimated at 1325 x Sol's radius (rounded to 1300 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph).
RSGC1-F13.png
RSGC1-F13 [FMR2006] 13 - a K2I supergiant estimated at 993 x Sol's radius (rounded to 990 Rsun on the rendered Celestia graph). Although a member of the cluster, it's more orange than red, hence an orange supergiant or OSCG1-F13.
RSGC1-F14.png
RSGC1-F14 [FMR2006] 14 - an M3I red supergiant estimated at 590 x Sol's radius.
Last edited by Eric Nelson on 22.06.2021, 08:31, edited 7 times in total.

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Gurren Lagann
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Post #685by Gurren Lagann » 20.06.2021, 15:34

Montage of the HR 8799 system.
Sisyphus-HR8799.png
"The tomorrow we're trying to reach is not a tomorrow you had decided on!"
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"Nothing is impossible for me, as long I'm determinated to keep moving forward!"
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- Me (Gurren)

Current major projects:
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Post #686by Eric Nelson » 20.06.2021, 15:49

This's a good look of an addon.
The disc looks good for it too.
The planets are spot on.

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trappistplanets
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Post #687by trappistplanets » 20.06.2021, 17:34

Eric Nelson wrote:The planets are spot on.
uh....we don't know what the planets look like

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Post #688by Eric Nelson » 20.06.2021, 17:47

Of course we don't.
Extrasolar planets are so far away (many light years from us) that even with the technology we got today, there's only been special cases of us finding out the color of one, such as HD 189733 Ab (which turned out to be blue) along with WASP-104 b, which turned out to be reddish aside from the low albedo.
Until we have the JWST and better telescopes set up, we're only guessing the color of many exoplanets and not to mention the blackbody spectrum also plays a role in people guessing what stars and planets look like up close.
The textures are good guesses of what they might look like up close and as of now it's a useful addon.

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trappistplanets
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Post #689by trappistplanets » 20.06.2021, 18:14

Eric Nelson wrote:Until we have the JWST and better telescopes set up, we're only guessing the color of many exoplanets and not to mention the blackbody spectrum also plays a role in people guessing what stars and planets look like up close.
guessing colors of stars is easyer because you already know its spectral type, and every spectral type has imaged (afar) counterparts we can use for references

Eric Nelson wrote:Extrasolar planets are so far away (many light years from us) that even with the technology we got today, there's only been special cases of us finding out the color of one, such as HD 189733 Ab (which turned out to be blue) along with WASP-104 b, which turned out to be reddish aside from the low albedo.
indeed, here was only 2 known exoplanets that had spectrum we were able to process into a color AFAIK

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Post #690by Eric Nelson » 21.06.2021, 01:37

yes and in reality, our journey through the universe has barely just begun.

Added after 7 hours 11 minutes:
V354 Cephei
V354 Cephei is an irregular variable star whose spectrum ranges from M2.5Iab to M3.5Ib (both of which make it a red supergiant) and its mass is only 3.61 x Sol's while its radius is estimated to be 685 x Sol's and its luminosity between 71000 and 76000 x Sol's.

It's located near the Cepheus OB1 stellar association (which's anywhere from 2.7 to 3.5 pc, averaging 3.4 pc based on Gaia 2's most reliable parallax data for OB neighbor stars) and a potential member.
The GAIA Data Release 2 parallax for V354 Cep is 0.4581 +/- 0.1023 mas, which on the other hand implies a much smaller distance at 2 kpc, which's unlikely as the excessive astrometric noise contributes to such a ridiculous yet unreliable measurement.

Added after 5 hours 43 minutes:
PZ Cassiopeiae
PZ Cassiopeiae.

A semiregular variable red supergiant in the constellation Cassiopeia.

It's 229,000 x as luminous as Sol and 1062 x its radius.

Its spectral type is M3Ia.

Added after 26 minutes 47 seconds:
NML Cygni
NML Cygni.

An M6.2Ia0-III red hypergiant located in the constellation Cygnus with at least 1183 x Sol's radius (though there's a slim - if any - chance of it ever turning out to be 2770 x Sol's radius based on a luminosity of 270000 x Sol's and a temperature of 2500 K, which would then make it the largest star we ever found to date). https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010A&A...523A..18D

Originally we expected the bolometric luminosity to be 500000 x Sol's with an assumed distance of 2 kpc, giving us a calculation of 3700 x Sol's radius (which is off the charts for any star) based on an angular diameter of 8.6 mas from such distance. https://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0405044
But recently better instruments helped give us an estimated distance of it being 1.6 kpc (which hints 200000 x Sol's luminosity) and a radio angular diameter of 44 mas was based on that distance, indicating the angular optical diameter's 22 mas. https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/pdf/2012/08/aa19587-12.pdf
Such distance and a luminosity 270000 x Sol's + the effective temperature gave the star an estimated radius of 1640 x Sol's based on 3250 K and 2770 x Sol's based on 2500 K (whereas the precise Stefan-Boltzmann Law) gave it a nominal solar effective temperature of 5772 K which combined with 270000 x Lsun = 1638.96 Rsun and at 2500 K indicated 2769.84 Rsun).
The GAIA Data Release 2 parallax is claimed to be 1.5259 +/- 0.5677 mas though of course the significant amount of noise in the data currently discourages it from being reliable.

The mass is incredibly difficult to calculate but 1 published measurement for it was 50 x Sol's mass (which we still agree with to this day). https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983ApJ...267..179M although the mass loss rate is 4.2 to 4.8 x 10-4 which makes it one of the highest known mass loss rates and certainly makes the star a hypergiant. https://arxiv.org/abs/0904.4690

It's also a semiregular variable star with a period of variability anywhere from 940 to 1280 Earth days. http://www.sai.msu.su/gcvs/cgi-bin/search.cgi?search=V1489+Cyg

Added after 31 minutes 16 seconds:
BO Carinae
BO Carinae, also known as HD 93420.
An irregular variable star in the constellation Carina.

Its maximum apparent magnitude's +7.18 and while its distance and membership's uncertain, its possible membership to the star cluster Trumpler 15 allows us an estimated distance of it being 2.5 kpc from Sol.
https://doi.org/10.1046%2Fj.1365-8711.2003.06186.x
Its an M4Ib red supergiant 3525 K, 439 x Sol's radius and 26000 x Sol's luminosity, with a mass loss rate of 0.3 x 10-9 Solar masses per year. https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000A&A...357..225J
GAIA 2's parallax value's 0.73 +/- 0.08 mas which would indicate a closer distance but too much noise = poor reliability. https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/full_html/2018/08/aa33051-18/aa33051-18.html

Added after 22 minutes 49 seconds:
HV 2112
HV 2112 is an M4.5Ia red supergiant and semiregular pulsating variable star in Carina with its apparent magnitude between 7.4 and 9.0.
The best-fit variation period is approx 347 Earth days.

It was assumed to be 4.2 kpc from Sol which would indicate 550000 to 675000 x Sol's luminosity and 2880 to 3190 x Sol's radius at 2930 K, which would without a doubt engulf the orbit of Saturn and make it the largest star found. https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988A&AS...72..259D
But recently newer calculations put the distance to 2.96 + 0.22 - 0.2 kpc indicating a radius 1168 x Sol's and a luminosity 288000 +75000 - 79000 x Sol's (bolometrically). https://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0504379
GAIA 2's parallax of 0.7759 +/- 0.1098 mas gives it a luminosity below 50000 x Sol's corresponding to a radius 574 x Sol's, but that value's considered unreliable due to the high level of astrometric noise.
Attachments
hv 2112.png
HV 2112, an M4.5I1 semiregular pulsating variable red supergiant star in Carina.
bo car.png
BO Car, an irregular variable M4Ib red supergiant in Carina.
nml cygni.png
NML Cygni, an M6.2Ia0-III red hypergiant in the constellation Cygnus. 1183 x Sol's radius in Celestia (though its its graph renders the number to 1200 Rsun which's rounded).
pz cas.png
PZ Cassiopeiae, an M3Ia semiregular variable red supergiant in Cassiopeiae.
v354 cep.png
V354 Cephei, an irregular variable star near the Cepheus OB1 association.
Last edited by Eric Nelson on 07.08.2021, 11:13, edited 1 time in total.

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IX Carinae

Post #691by Eric Nelson » 22.06.2021, 06:46

IX Carinae, an M2Iab red supergiant pulsating and semiregular variable star, averaging 566 x Sol's radius and its maximum luminosity from 7.2 to 8.5 x Sol's at a period of 508 to 4400 Earth days.

Added after 1 hour 47 minutes:
KW Sagittarii
KW Sagittarii is usually an M1.5ab star, but is sometimes an M0I as well as an M4I star, making it a semiregular variable red supergiant.
Its mass is 4.89 + 0.96 - 0.07 x Sols.

Its was estimated by Emily Levesque to have a luminosity of 363000 x Sol's and a radius of 1460 x Sol's, though recently the angular diameter and luminosity with better technology has calculated the luminosity and radius to be lower than previously thought, putting the luminosity to 176000 + 164000 - 87000 x Sol's (bolometrically though) and its radius at 1009 +/- 142 x Sol's.

The distance is 2.42 kpc based on the assumption of membership on the Sagittarius OB5 association https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.14649 whereas the Hipparcos mission calculated a negative measurement with poor information other than it being a very large distance. https://arxiv.org/abs/0708.1752
The GAIA Data Release 2 parallax for KW Sgr is 0.5281 +/- 0.1392 mas (milliarcseconds) implying a distance of 1.9 kpc, and a prior calculation based on the structure of the Milky Way gave it a distance of 1.945 kpc +1.039 kpc - 511 pc, which's a huge margin of error, indicating the astrometric noise in the GAIA data far exceeds allowable levels, making the GAIA 2 parallax unreliable. https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/full_html/2018/08/aa33051-18/aa33051-18.html

An up-to-date radius of KY Sgr in Celestia using nessun's RSG addon https://celestia.space/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=20398 is based on magnitude to be around 994 x Sol's which's within the margin of error of +/- 142 Rsun in the 1009 value, making it acceptable to render.
Attachments
kw sgr.png
KW Sagittarii, semiregular variable red supergiant in Sagittarius.
ix car.png
IX Carinae, an M2Iab pulsating semiregular variable red supergiant in Carina.
Last edited by Eric Nelson on 07.08.2021, 06:12, edited 2 times in total.

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MrSpace43
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Post #692by MrSpace43 » 22.06.2021, 15:50

Nodrak and its moon Perios
Nodrak and Perios.png
Last edited by MrSpace43 on 22.06.2021, 15:52, edited 1 time in total.
Been into Astronomy since the age of 5 or 6. Started making planetary textures back in late 2016. 3D animator who makes high quality animations in Cinema 4D. I find it funny that Nintendo officially called Boom Boom, a "mad lad" lol. Currently on the quest to find a piece of space music I only heard in one YT video (which unfortunately was deleted or made private).

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Post #693by Eric Nelson » 22.06.2021, 15:51

Good work though. :smile:
Last edited by Eric Nelson on 07.08.2021, 06:13, edited 1 time in total.

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trappistplanets
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Post #694by trappistplanets » 22.06.2021, 20:13

Eric Nelson wrote:Decent artistic impression of how it might look up close, though its just an impression.
its fictional not real

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Post #695by Eric Nelson » 23.06.2021, 10:59

Well it's pretty great work though.

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trappistplanets
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Post #696by trappistplanets » 01.07.2021, 22:57

Nix
unknown.png

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MrSpace43
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Post #697by MrSpace43 » 03.07.2021, 20:32

A view of Fidon and 2 of its major moons (Regol & Torkala)
Worlds of Ice and Rock.png
Been into Astronomy since the age of 5 or 6. Started making planetary textures back in late 2016. 3D animator who makes high quality animations in Cinema 4D. I find it funny that Nintendo officially called Boom Boom, a "mad lad" lol. Currently on the quest to find a piece of space music I only heard in one YT video (which unfortunately was deleted or made private).

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trappistplanets
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Post #698by trappistplanets » 04.07.2021, 00:56

MrSpace43 wrote:A view of Fidon and 2 of its major moons (Regol & Torkala)
nice

planet looks like a saturn lookalike

Added after 1 minute 19 seconds:
Nix
(updated texture and shape model)
nix.gif

nix2.gif

(click on the 2 nix attachments to see the gifs move)

apperently there was this image of nix (half lit) that i didn't know about
https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/727575122441011271/861037998779138068/nix.png
so i updated the shape model and textures

Kerberos
(shape model is guesed from images, texture is compleatly fictional but based off the most likely climate (icy object with a outer layer of clean water ice, therefor giving it a snowy blueish color)

unknown.png

john71
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Post #699by john71 » 06.07.2021, 07:39

OGLE-2005-BLG-390L b 16k from NASA textures:

Ogle-1.png

Ogle-2.png

Ogle-3.png

Ogle-4.png


Added after 3 hours 34 minutes:
59 Vir b 16k based on a NASA texture:

59 Vir-1.png

59 Vir-2.png

59 Vir-3.png

59 Vir-4.png

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trappistplanets
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Post #700by trappistplanets » 06.07.2021, 16:57

john71 wrote:OGLE-2005-BLG-390L b 16k from NASA textures:
where did you get the NASA textures from?


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